Genealogy

Mar 15, 2011

About the Library Collection


Part I... Part II...

Part III... Part IV...

Part V... Part VI...

Part VII... EBSCO...


Category: The News
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Part I

The Library collection consists of many types of items.  Over the course of this article we will discuss these types and how to access them.

The library catalog (often referred to as the eLibrary) is available both inside the library and through the Internet website.  Our various types of materials are identified in the eLibrary catalog by small colored icons or symbols.  Since libraries are most often associated with physical books, we will begin there.

A blue book symbol appears to the right of each book title in the eLibrary catalog.  For those who love the feel of a book, enjoy snuggling in front of a warm fire with a good read or just want to learn, our book collection offers a wide range of choices.  Fiction genres of mystery, western, science fiction/fantasy; non-fiction subjects such as biography, local history, poetry, sciences—all ages can find something to sink their teeth into.

All books check out for 28 days and may be renewed unless on hold for another patron.  Holds may be placed on unavailable items through the eLibrary catalog or by request at the library.  Overdue books are charged a fine of 10 cents per day.  The replacement cost of lost or damaged books must be paid in-order-to continue borrowing other items.

Part II

The Library collection consists of many types of items.  Newspapers, magazines and reference materials are part of the physical collection, in addition to books.

Issues of The Billings Gazette, The Great Falls Tribune and The Wall Street Journal are received daily.  The News-Argus is received twice weekly and archived on microfilm.  These are not shown in the eLibrary catalog and do not check out.

In the eLibrary catalog, a green magazine symbol appears to the far right of each magazine or periodical title of a physical magazine.  The collection includes titles for both youth and adult interests. Infotrac, the Online periodical database, will be discussed in a future issue.  Magazines (except for the current issue) check out for 28 days and may be renewed unless on hold for another patron.  Holds may be placed on unavailable items through the eLibrary catalog or by request at the library.  Overdue mazines are charged a fine of 10 cents per day.  The replacement cost of a lost or damaged magazine must be paid in-order-to continue borrowing other items.

A books-on-a-table symbol appears to the far right of each reference item title, such as non-circulating encyclopedias, dictionaries, or special items in the Montana Collection.

Part III

The Library collection consists of many types of items, not all on the printed page.  Sound recordings come in two formats:  audio cassette and audio CD, in both music and books.  Movies also come in two formats, VHS and DVD.  All of these items are available in both the youth and adult areas.

In the eLibrary catalog, a cassette symbol appears to the far right of each cassette title. “[Sound recording (cassette)]” follows the title.

A silver CD symbol appears to the far right of each CD recording.  “[Sound recording (CD)]” follows the title.

The DVD symbol looks similar to the CD symbol, but with DVD written on it.  “[Videorecording (DVD)]” follows the title.

The symbol for VHS movie recordings looks like a video cassette case. “[Videorecording (VHS)]” follows the title.

All of the above are physical items that check out for 28 days and may be renewed unless on hold for another patron.  Holds may be placed on unavailable items through the eLibrary catalog or by request at the library.  Overdue items are charged a fine of 10 cents per day.  The replacement cost of a lost or damaged item must be paid in-order-to continue borrowing other items.

Part IV

The three previous sections have discussed the types of physical items in the library collection.  As we get further into the digital age, our digital media collection is growing.  What do we mean by “digital media”?  According to BusinessDictionary.com, “digital media is any digitized content (text, graphics, audio, and video) that can be transmitted over Internet or computer networks.” Since this involves electronics, “e” often becomes part of the name, as in our own eLibrary catalog. This also means that many items in our catalog are not available in a physical, hands-on format, but must be viewed on a computer or “downloaded” to a personal computer and/or a special device.  These devices include MP3 players, eBook readers and a variety of mobile devices such as iPads or android phones.  With the rapid development of new technology, this area is constantly changing.

All of our digital media is identified, following the title, by “(electronic resource).”

Audio recordings that must be downloaded to hear are identified by a CD with an arrow icon.  When you click on the silver link icon located below the title, you will connect with MontanaLibrary2Go.  If this is your first time, you will need to follow the instructions for downloading Overdrive software to your computer. Check the list of compatible devices to be sure that your mobile listening device will work.  To checkout and download the title, you will need to be a member of the Library in good standing, and have the number on the back of your Library card available.  Select a title, put into your cart, proceed to checkout and follow the instructions. Once the book is on your computer, you may then transfer it to your listening device.  Audio downloads are available for 14 days and then expire.  You do not have to return anything and there are no fines. You will be notified by email when a placed hold is available and have three days to respond.  Up to five titles may be checked out at a time.

You may also go directly to the MontanaLibrary2Go site by clicking on the download icon on the Library homepage.  And, you may use our download station located in the library provided that you bring your listening device and connecting cable. Please contact the Library at 538-5212 with any questions.

Part V

All of our digital media is identified, following the title, by “(electronic resource).”

E-Books are identified by a symbol representing an e-reader which appears to the far right of the title in the eLibrary catalog.  We have two types of eBooks: those available to read “online” anytime, and those available only by download.

An “Online resource” title is always available by clicking on the silver link  icon located below the title. E-Books in the Gale Virtual Reference Library may be read on any computer, in the library or at home. There is no need to checkout or return this item.  NetLibrary eBooks may be viewed anytime from a Library computer.  To view from a home computer, you will first need to establish an account via a Library computer. Please contact the Library at 538-5212 with any questions.

Part VI

E-Books to download are identified by either “Downloadable Material” or “MontanaLibrary2Go Content” below the eBook title.

E-Books are identified by an e-Reader symbol appearing to the far right of the title in the eLibrary catalog.  We have two types of eBooks: those available to read “online” anytime, and those available only by download. E-Books to download are identified by either “Downloadable Material” or “MontanaLibrary2Go Content” below the eBook title.

To download an eBook, you must use your own computer and have Adobe Digital Editions software installed.  The MontanaLibrary2Go site will walk you through this installation process (a one-time event). Click on MyHelp for instructions. You will also need to determine if your device is compatible with MontanaLibrary2Go.  These eBooks check out for your choice of 7 or 14 days and may be returned early.  The book becomes inaccessible after the loan period. (Kindle e-readers work through your Amazon account and do not require Adobe Digital Software.)

“Downloadable Material” eBooks come from the Gutenberg Project and may be loaded to an e-reader device.  These books are free for life, as they are no longer under copyright.  When downloading these titles, you will need to select the correct format for your device.  The e-pub format works on most devices. Please contact the Library at 538-5212 with any questions.

Part VII

In the previous sections, we have discussed both the physical and digital types of items available in our library collection, and the icons that identify these items in the eLibrary catalog.  Two additional icons are important in the catalog.

A silver link icon appears on each electronic resource item. When clicked on, it connects to one of these websites: MontanaLibrary2Go, Project Gutenberg, Gale Virtual Reference Library and NetLibrary. This connection is necessary for you to complete the download transaction for the current item. If this link icon appears on a book item, it will open a window which provides additional information from the publisher about the book.

Youth titles may display a yellow half sunshine icon.  When clicked on, the Children’s Literature Review will display, providing reviews, award information, and Accelerated Reader information.

The eLibrary catalog enables access to the wide range of items available from the Library collection. Whether physical or digital, informational or recreational, there is something for everyone.

EBSCO, the On-line Periodical Database

Need a magazine or newspaper article?  Doing research that requires a professional journal?  The Library subscribes to a periodical database, EBSCO, which you may access from your home computer.  Open the Library’s webpage, www.lewistownlibrary.org, and click on IEBSCO. Log in by entering "discovery."  EBSCO consists of a variety of databases, each composed of magazines, research journals, newspapers, books and multi-media, relating to agribusiness, health, education and retail business news.  You may search all the databases or select specific ones.  Enter your search terms and click search.  You may limit a search to full text articles, or include abstracts.  All the articles that you check “Mark”, may be printed, downloaded, or emailed, simply by viewing “marked articles.”  This is just a quick overview of how to use EBSCO.  Please contact the Library if you have any questions.


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